dough


dough
dough, batter, paste are quasi-synonyms often confused in their modern cookery senses. All denote a mixture of flour, liquid, salt, and supplementary ingredients, but each suggests a difference both in consistency as a result of the variety and proportion of ingredients and in use.
Dough applies to a mixture with only enough liquid in relation to the flour to bind the ingredients while leaving the mixture sufficiently stiff to knead or to shape before baking. Ordinarily other ingredients (as a leavening agent, fat, and sugar) are included to improve the texture, flavor, and nutritive qualities of the ultimate product which includes such items as bread, biscuit, rolls, and some kinds of cake and cookies.
Batter applies to a thinner mass in which the proportion of liquid is much greater than in dough; characteristically, also, it contains eggs, and often baking powder, sugar, and fat. It may be used for cakes that are shaped by the pan in which they are baked or for those that are poured in small amounts on a hot griddle or pan and quickly cooked. Batter also designates a similar mixture of flour, liquid, and eggs into which raw food (as fish or oysters) are dipped before frying in hot fat.
Paste applies to a mixture like dough in its stiffness and in its admitting of being rolled and shaped but differs in implying the use of a large proportion of fat and a very small proportion of liquid; it names, therefore, the mixture out of which pastries (as pies and tarts) are made.

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • dough — dough·er·ty; dough; dough·i·ness; dough·nut; dough·ti·ly; dough·ti·ness; dough·ty; …   English syllables

  • dough — [dəʊ ǁ doʊ] noun [uncountable] informal money: • He made a huge pile of dough working for an investment bank. * * * dough UK US /dəʊ/ noun [U] INFORMAL ► money: »He says he can make a lot of d …   Financial and business terms

  • Dough — Dough, n. [OE. dagh, dogh, dow, AS. d[=a]h; akin to D. deeg, G. teig, Icel. deig, Sw. deg, Dan. deig, Goth. daigs; also, to Goth. deigan to knead, L. fingere to form, shape, Skr. dih to smear; cf. Gr. ? wall, ? to touch, handle. ?. Cf. {Feign},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dough|y — «DOH ee», adjective, dough|i|er, dough|i|est. of or like dough; soft and thick; pale and flabby …   Useful english dictionary

  • dough — O.E. dag dough, from P.Gmc. *daigaz something kneaded (Cf. O.N. deig, Swed. deg, M.Du. deech, Du. deeg, O.H.G. teic, Ger. Teig, Goth. daigs dough ), from PIE *dheigh to build, to form, to knead (Cf. Skt …   Etymology dictionary

  • dough — [dəu US dou] n [: Old English; Origin: dag] 1.) [singular, U] a mixture of flour and water ready to be baked into bread, ↑pastry etc 2.) [U] informal money …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • dough — [ dou ] noun 1. ) count or uncount a mixture of flour, water, SHORTENING, etc. that is baked to make bread or PASTRY 2. ) uncount INFORMAL money …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • dough — [n] money beans*, boodle*, bread*, bucks*, cabbage*, cash, change, chips, clams*, coin, coinage, cold cash, currency, dinero, funds, greenback*, hard cash*, legal tender, lettuce*, loot, moola, pesos*, wealth; concept 340 …   New thesaurus

  • dough — ► NOUN 1) a thick mixture of flour and liquid, for baking into bread or pastry. 2) informal money. DERIVATIVES doughy adjective (doughier, doughiest) . ORIGIN Old English …   English terms dictionary

  • dough — [dō] n. [ME < OE dag, akin to Goth daigs, Ger teig < IE base * dheiĝh , to knead, form > Gr teichos, wall, L fingere, to form] 1. a mixture of flour, liquid, leavening, and other ingredients, worked into a soft, thick mass for baking… …   English World dictionary